linkedin
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
Exclusive Access, Inclusive Growth

WELCOME TO ET PRIME

BROUGTH TO YOU BY
Exclusive Access, Inclusive Growth

Get access to free reads

Start Your Trial Start Your membership

Get 15-day free trial to all of ET Prime

Start Your Trial Start Your membership
Not a member
Already a member?
Not a member

Your membership

RENEW
ET Prime
Ed-tech

Scripting a secure future: ed-tech startups parse new models as coding battleground shifts to K12

The skill gap in India is alarming. While graduates comprise 12% of the working-age population in the country, their unemployment rate is double the average rate. In the next three years, more than 20 million graduates will join the workforce. A clutch of ed-tech companies are trying to bridge this gap. Can an early introduction to coding be the solution?
Increase Font
Decrease Font
Cancel
By
7 Aug 2020 7 Mins Read 0 comment
iStock
In what could be termed one of the fastest venture capital exits, the early backers of WhiteHat Jr, a one-and-a-half-year-old ed-tech startup, made a windfall when Byju’s earlier this week announced that it would pay USD300 million to acquire the company that teaches coding to kids. For a young company that has raised only USD11 million in funding and
to lose focus of the core objective of coding — ensuring a better future for children. Because, there’s a fine line between teaching coding and making children think that if they can’t become coders, they don’t have a future. And that’s a line that we can only hope companies and educational institutions don’t cross. ( Graphics by Sadhana Saxena)
In what could be termed one of the fastest venture capital exits, the early backers of WhiteHat Jr, a one-and-a-half-year-old ed-tech startup, made a windfall when Byju’s earlier this week announced that it would pay USD300 million to acquire the company that teaches coding to kids. For a young company that has raised only USD11 million in funding and to lose focus of the core objective of coding — ensuring a better future for children. Because, there’s a fine line between teaching coding and making children think that if they can’t become coders, they don’t have a future. And that’s a line that we can only hope companies and educational institutions don’t cross. ( Graphics by Sadhana Saxena)

The latest from ET Prime is now on Telegram. To subscribe to our Telegram newsletter click here.

Gift this story

YOU CAN GIFT 0 MORE STORIES THIS MONTH

Maximum 10 Email IDs allowed

300 characters remaining

Gift Sent Successfully

Limit Reached
Limit Reached

You’ve gifted all the 0 articles from your monthly gift bucket!

Please come back next month.

0 more articles will be waiting for you in your gift bucket.

Current Edition

[[^message]]

Result

[[/message]] [[#message]]

[[message]]

[[/message]]