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Alternative therapy

Plasma therapy to fight the virus: throwing everything at the wall to see what sticks

It’s a seemingly easy, affordable, and low-risk treatment being suggested for Covid-19 patients. In reality, plasma therapy remains an experimental intervention and has failed to scale up as a standard treatment. Anecdotal results have helped fuel hype about the therapy, highlighting the need for hard evidence backed by standard safety procedures.
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vikasdandekar1
17 Jul 2020 9 Mins Read 1 comments
A bag containing plasma extracted through a process called plasmapheresis at Hemorio in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Getty Images
A bag containing plasma extracted through a process called plasmapheresis at Hemorio in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
For two momentous events separated by a century, the similarities are uncanny. The Spanish flu of 1918 and the current Covid-19 outbreak spanned continents, overwhelmed healthcare systems, and raged on for several months. Responses to both the crises were marked by confusion and misinformation. But amid all the chaos, one simple therapy offered some hope. Like they did
In 1901, Emil Behring received the first Nobel Prize for physiology and medicine as he demonstrated that plasma could be used to treat diphtheria. But for Covid-19? Till the time the results of clinical trials from international sites show convincing evidence, it could be as good as a toss of a coin. ( Graphic by Mohammad Arshad)
For two momentous events separated by a century, the similarities are uncanny. The Spanish flu of 1918 and the current Covid-19 outbreak spanned continents, overwhelmed healthcare systems, and raged on for several months. Responses to both the crises were marked by confusion and misinformation. But amid all the chaos, one simple therapy offered some hope. Like they did In 1901, Emil Behring received the first Nobel Prize for physiology and medicine as he demonstrated that plasma could be used to treat diphtheria. But for Covid-19? Till the time the results of clinical trials from international sites show convincing evidence, it could be as good as a toss of a coin. ( Graphic by Mohammad Arshad)

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user Vikas Dandekar ET Prime, Editor - Pharma and Life Sciences

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