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Stuck in time, Indian sanitary-pad market needs a product shake-up

The biggest business opportunity for sanitary-pad makers in India is still to get women to use pads at all. The focus is on launching lower-cost products and expanding distribution. New brands are coming up with new designs and premium offerings, but brand loyalty and social taboo are holding them back.
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soumyagupta
24 Jun 2020 7 Mins Read 2 comments
Disposable sanitary towels were introduced in the 1890s as an alternative to washable types. Getty Images
Disposable sanitary towels were introduced in the 1890s as an alternative to washable types.
When Arunachalam Muruganantham, the Padman, decided to come up with a machine that made low-cost pads at scale, he was solving a problem first for himself, and then for others in smaller ones and villages of India – accessing hygienic sanitary napkins. His pad, manufactured by his firm Jayaashree Industries, found a way to cut costs by using cellulose fibres
Going direct to consumer is key, as is building presence in urban-chemist networks like Nobel Hygiene is doing for RIO. If there can be premiumisation of practically everything urban Indian consumers use today (from bamboo toothbrushes and charcoal toothpastes to gourmet organic fruit juices), this is only the last, and toughest, frontier. ( Graphics by Abdul Shafiq)
When Arunachalam Muruganantham, the Padman, decided to come up with a machine that made low-cost pads at scale, he was solving a problem first for himself, and then for others in smaller ones and villages of India – accessing hygienic sanitary napkins. His pad, manufactured by his firm Jayaashree Industries, found a way to cut costs by using cellulose fibres Going direct to consumer is key, as is building presence in urban-chemist networks like Nobel Hygiene is doing for RIO. If there can be premiumisation of practically everything urban Indian consumers use today (from bamboo toothbrushes and charcoal toothpastes to gourmet organic fruit juices), this is only the last, and toughest, frontier. ( Graphics by Abdul Shafiq)

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Stuck in time, Indian sanitary-pad market needs a product shake-up
FMCG

Stuck in time, Indian sanitary-pad market needs a product shake-up

The biggest business opportunity for sanitary-pad makers in India is still to get women to use pads at all. The focus is on launching lower-cost products and expanding distribution. New brands are coming up with new designs and premium offerings, but brand loyalty and social taboo are holding them back.

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