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Crouching tiger is the hidden dragon. How kirana stores used novel sourcing and clever approach to inventory to win.

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Crouching tiger is the hidden dragon. How kirana stores used novel sourcing and clever approach to inventory to win.

Kirana stores rule the packaged consumer-goods distribution but are derided as inefficient. They have used some of this ‘inefficiency’ and some street-fighting ingenuity to keep the supplies of essential goods flowing. While these positive effects may wane, they surely give the general trade more goodwill, and perhaps even the bargaining clout.
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21 Apr 2020 13 Mins Read 6 comments
People wait outside a store in Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh, to buy groceries during the lockdown. Getty Images
People wait outside a store in Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh, to buy groceries during the lockdown.
The philosopher Zeno of Elea (490-430 BC) had a penchant for paradoxes. One of them is the paradox of the Achilles and the tortoise. According to it, if Achilles — the most swift-footed of all mortals — and a tortoise were to compete in a race, the tortoise would win. Aristotle, paraphrasing Zeno, said: “In a race, the quickest runner
more competitive and do well. Zeno’s paradox was solved mathematically only with the invention of calculus in the 17th century, almost 2,000 years after it was first expressed. The kirana may not be around for as long as the paradox, but it will survive in the Indian economic system for the foreseeable future. ( Graphics by Mohammad Arshad)
The philosopher Zeno of Elea (490-430 BC) had a penchant for paradoxes. One of them is the paradox of the Achilles and the tortoise. According to it, if Achilles — the most swift-footed of all mortals — and a tortoise were to compete in a race, the tortoise would win. Aristotle, paraphrasing Zeno, said: “In a race, the quickest runner more competitive and do well. Zeno’s paradox was solved mathematically only with the invention of calculus in the 17th century, almost 2,000 years after it was first expressed. The kirana may not be around for as long as the paradox, but it will survive in the Indian economic system for the foreseeable future. ( Graphics by Mohammad Arshad)

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user Mahesh Gourishetty Five-Star Business Finance Limited, HR Head

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