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Tested, but not OK: Indian food exports hit quality wall. Here’s how to regain the lost flavour

From mixing dill seeds in jeera to the presence of high traces of insecticides in basmati and unauthorised colour in turmeric, Indian food products are increasingly facing rejection in major export markets on various grounds. To revive the demand for its agricultural products in lucrative markets, the country must take immediate steps to check adulteration and misbranding.
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5 Mar 2020 4 Mins Read 2 comments
A villager processes dried fish in West Bengal, on December 26, 2018. Getty Images
A villager processes dried fish in West Bengal, on December 26, 2018.
Indian agri-and-processed food products are fast losing flavour in the exports market. From basmati rice to spices to marine products, consignments from the country are increasingly flunking quality tests in several lucrative export destinations. For instance, as recently as a fortnight ago, quality concerns were flagged in Greece after a consignment of sesame seeds from India was found
recognised brands such as California almonds, Chilean wines, and Swiss chocolates enjoy a premium positioning in their respective product segments and hence fetch better prices, enjoy brand loyalty, and continue to build a strong customer base. Surely, India has a lot to learn from these countries and their flagship export products. ( Graphics by Abdul Shafiq)
Indian agri-and-processed food products are fast losing flavour in the exports market. From basmati rice to spices to marine products, consignments from the country are increasingly flunking quality tests in several lucrative export destinations. For instance, as recently as a fortnight ago, quality concerns were flagged in Greece after a consignment of sesame seeds from India was found recognised brands such as California almonds, Chilean wines, and Swiss chocolates enjoy a premium positioning in their respective product segments and hence fetch better prices, enjoy brand loyalty, and continue to build a strong customer base. Surely, India has a lot to learn from these countries and their flagship export products. ( Graphics by Abdul Shafiq)

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