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From Barclays to RBS to Goldman Sachs, why foreign banks fail to crack the India story

Foreign banks in India have failed to get a foot in the door and have a puny 4.33% share in total advances. High capital requirements after the 2008 crisis and problems in home markets forced them to retreat in disarray. Private banks in India have filled the white space left by them.
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Joel
24 Feb 2020 5 Mins Read 3 comments
A man cycles past the RBS and Standard Chartered banks in Gurugram. Getty Images
A man cycles past the RBS and Standard Chartered banks in Gurugram.
When the Indian economy was warming up to overseas investments and companies at the turn of the century, a bunch of foreign banks hunkered down with the growing ubiquity of their shiny offices. They were touted to be the next big thing in the Indian banking space. And understandably so — they had professional expertise, unlimited capital, and innovative products.
banking consultant Ashvin Parekh. For foreign banks, it will mean depending on cross-border businesses like mergers and acquisitions or inbound investments into India because a slowdown in the domestic economy means that Indian companies are unlikely to look abroad for purchases. In other words, foreign banks could shrink further in India. ( Graphics by Mohammad Arshad)
When the Indian economy was warming up to overseas investments and companies at the turn of the century, a bunch of foreign banks hunkered down with the growing ubiquity of their shiny offices. They were touted to be the next big thing in the Indian banking space. And understandably so — they had professional expertise, unlimited capital, and innovative products. banking consultant Ashvin Parekh. For foreign banks, it will mean depending on cross-border businesses like mergers and acquisitions or inbound investments into India because a slowdown in the domestic economy means that Indian companies are unlikely to look abroad for purchases. In other words, foreign banks could shrink further in India. ( Graphics by Mohammad Arshad)

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