linkedin
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
Exclusive Access, Inclusive Growth

WELCOME TO ET PRIME

BROUGTH TO YOU BY
Exclusive Access, Inclusive Growth
ET Prime
Cybersecurity

India’s rush for facial recognition: It should first sort out its stand on privacy and data security

Two years ago, the Supreme Court said privacy is a fundamental right. In the light of that judgment, there is an urgent need for India to have a public debate on facial recognition. Also, it’s high time that the government finalised its stance on the data-protection bill.
font size
FONT SIZE
save
SAVE
saved
SAVED
Gift this article
GIFT ARTICLE
Raman
30 Aug 2019 6 Mins Read 0 comment
A member of the airport staff shows a passenger how to register his personal details at a facial-recognition counter at the Rajiv Gandhi International Airport in Hyderabad. Getty Images
A member of the airport staff shows a passenger how to register his personal details at a facial-recognition counter at the Rajiv Gandhi International Airport in Hyderabad.
This is a good time to pause and reflect on the contentious topics of facial recognition, privacy, and surveillance. News outlets and social media are full of the images of Hong Kong protesters tearing down smart towers being allegedly used for facial recognition by authorities there. The striking visuals are just the most recent development in public-facing deployments of facial-recognition
the ethical responsibility on Indian technology developers to be careful, particularly when dealing with potential project partnerships or bids that might result in the use of facial-recognition technologies to repress, exclude, or persecute rather than empower. ( Raman Jit Singh Chima serves as Asia policy director and senior international counsel at Access Now, and chairs the Internet Freedom Foundation)
This is a good time to pause and reflect on the contentious topics of facial recognition, privacy, and surveillance. News outlets and social media are full of the images of Hong Kong protesters tearing down smart towers being allegedly used for facial recognition by authorities there. The striking visuals are just the most recent development in public-facing deployments of facial-recognition the ethical responsibility on Indian technology developers to be careful, particularly when dealing with potential project partnerships or bids that might result in the use of facial-recognition technologies to repress, exclude, or persecute rather than empower. ( Raman Jit Singh Chima serves as Asia policy director and senior international counsel at Access Now, and chairs the Internet Freedom Foundation)

The latest from ET Prime is now on Telegram. To subscribe to our Telegram newsletter click here.

Gift this story

YOU CAN GIFT 0 MORE STORIES THIS MONTH

Maximum 10 Email IDs allowed

300 characters remaining

Gift Sent Successfully

Limit Reached
Limit Reached

You’ve gifted all the 0 articles from your monthly gift bucket!

Please come back next month.

0 more articles will be waiting for you in your gift bucket.

Current Edition

Message from Planet Labs’ eye in the sky: India is a medieval knight in the age of modern warfare
Space

Message from Planet Labs’ eye in the sky: India is a medieval knight in the age of modern warfare

Satellite pictures of the Galwan valley region shared by US-based Planet Labs exposed China backtracking on the agreement with India to disengage. While the images did help India foster its case in shaping global opinion, it also exposes the country’s unpreparedness in advanced technologies. The episode underlines the urgent need to nurture companies in satellite imaging and space technology.

[[^message]]

Result

[[/message]] [[#message]]

[[message]]

[[/message]]