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Tiger Global invested USD90 million in Ninjacart. Does the B2B produce supplier justify the billing?

It has a marquee investor, a potentially high-margin business model, and is working on superior tech solutions. But Ninjacart’s bets on winning India’s B2B fresh-produce delivery market is up against deep-pocketed traditional conglomerates taking renewed guard.
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15 Jul 2019 17 Mins Read 0 comment
Thirukumaran Nagarajan, co-founder and CEO, Ninjacart BCCL
Thirukumaran Nagarajan, co-founder and CEO, Ninjacart
In April, when Bengaluru-based business-to-business (B2B) fresh-produce supply company, Ninjacart, raised nearly USD100 million, it got some tongues wagging in the city’s much clued-in venture-capital and founder ecosystem. After all, it wasn’t any other investor who led that funding round. It was the venerable New York-based Tiger Global Management, an investment firm whose thesis and investments have often read the
investor quoted above says, “Amazon could do it. Walmart could do it if it wanted to. But why would they spend to build from the scratch? They could instead acquire Ninjacart.” While that might be a dream scenario for investors, Ninjacart isn’t done on its own. At least for the next 10 years. ( Graphic by Sadhana Saxena)
In April, when Bengaluru-based business-to-business (B2B) fresh-produce supply company, Ninjacart, raised nearly USD100 million, it got some tongues wagging in the city’s much clued-in venture-capital and founder ecosystem. After all, it wasn’t any other investor who led that funding round. It was the venerable New York-based Tiger Global Management, an investment firm whose thesis and investments have often read the investor quoted above says, “Amazon could do it. Walmart could do it if it wanted to. But why would they spend to build from the scratch? They could instead acquire Ninjacart.” While that might be a dream scenario for investors, Ninjacart isn’t done on its own. At least for the next 10 years. ( Graphic by Sadhana Saxena)

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