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WHO recognises Traditional Chinese Medicines. Can it threaten endangered wildlife in India?

The World Health Organization’s official acknowledgment of Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCM), which use animal parts, could spur the already-massive illegal wildlife trade between India and China. The Chinese have been busy promoting TCM across the globe in recent years, worrying conservationists in India.
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28 Jun 2019 5 Mins Read 0 comment
A woman mixing medicine in the pharmacy of the Yueyang Hospital, part of the Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Shanghai, China. Getty Images
A woman mixing medicine in the pharmacy of the Yueyang Hospital, part of the Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Shanghai, China.
China recently became India’s second-largest trading partner, and the Asian giants want to forge closer business ties. But a flourishing, subterranean trade between the two countries would be a matter of concern for most Indians — China is one of the biggest importers of illegal wildlife goods from India. About 20% of the illegal global wildlife trade, pegged between
is a demand-driven market. We are already seeing an increase in the poaching of lesser-known species that are linked to TCM (such as pangolins, sea cucumber, sea horses).” Even as the efficacy of traditional Chinese medicines remains a subject of debate, WHO’s decision may emerge as a major source of concern for India. ( Graphics by Abdul Shafiq)
China recently became India’s second-largest trading partner, and the Asian giants want to forge closer business ties. But a flourishing, subterranean trade between the two countries would be a matter of concern for most Indians — China is one of the biggest importers of illegal wildlife goods from India. About 20% of the illegal global wildlife trade, pegged between is a demand-driven market. We are already seeing an increase in the poaching of lesser-known species that are linked to TCM (such as pangolins, sea cucumber, sea horses).” Even as the efficacy of traditional Chinese medicines remains a subject of debate, WHO’s decision may emerge as a major source of concern for India. ( Graphics by Abdul Shafiq)

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