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Indian boardrooms are closing the yawning gap between the old and the young, albeit reluctantly

  • Over 100 directors above the age of 75 have resigned from their boards.
  • But many continue in their roles, a matter of worry for governance experts.
  • Companies are forced to tweak board compositions, but India is still behind the curve.
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nsundareshasubramanian
28 May 2019 6 Mins Read 1 comments
Over 100 directors of Indian companies over the age of 75 have resigned, paving the way for younger members. Getty Images
Over 100 directors of Indian companies over the age of 75 have resigned, paving the way for younger members.
Rajendra Ambalal Shah, 87, has been serving as a director on the board of Colgate- Palmolive (India) for the last 36 years. As a foreign-exchange law expert, the Crawford Bayley partner is sought after by many multinationals. But a regulation by the Securities and Exchange Board of India (Sebi) bars Shah from continuing on the board without a fresh
non-executive directors. The Tata group, a rare exception, had brought down the age limit for non-executive directors from 75 to 70 a few years ago. The recent Sebi move helps address extreme cases like Shah’s and his fellow octogenarians, but deeper reforms are required to make Indian boards truly young, diverse, and competent. ( Graphics by Abdul Shafiq)
Rajendra Ambalal Shah, 87, has been serving as a director on the board of Colgate- Palmolive (India) for the last 36 years. As a foreign-exchange law expert, the Crawford Bayley partner is sought after by many multinationals. But a regulation by the Securities and Exchange Board of India (Sebi) bars Shah from continuing on the board without a fresh non-executive directors. The Tata group, a rare exception, had brought down the age limit for non-executive directors from 75 to 70 a few years ago. The recent Sebi move helps address extreme cases like Shah’s and his fellow octogenarians, but deeper reforms are required to make Indian boards truly young, diverse, and competent. ( Graphics by Abdul Shafiq)

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user Dr P Ramlal NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, WARANGAL, TELANGANA, INDIA, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND WRITER

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