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Climate change

What would you pay to save the world?

We're getting better at understanding how much people will suffer from climate change — and how unevenly the impacts will be felt.
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23 May 2019 9 Mins Read 1 comments
An Indian youth scouts around for mud crabs and snakehead fishes as he walks on the parched bed of Chembarambakkam lake on the outskirts of Chennai on May 21, 2019. Water levels in the four main reservoirs in Chennai have fallen to one of its lowest levels in 70 years. Getty Images
An Indian youth scouts around for mud crabs and snakehead fishes as he walks on the parched bed of Chembarambakkam lake on the outskirts of Chennai on May 21, 2019. Water levels in the four main reservoirs in Chennai have fallen to one of its lowest levels in 70 years.
By David Rotman In contrast to the existential angst currently in fashion around climate change, there's a cold-eyed calculation that its advocates, mostly economists, like to call the most important number you've never heard of. It's the social cost of carbon. It reflects the global damage of emitting one ton of carbon dioxide into the sky, accounting for its
the price of fuel is wise economic policy. A much smaller increase sparked the gilets jaunes riots in France last winter. That is the dilemma, both political and ethical, that we all face with climate change. ( David Rotman is editor at large of MIT Technology Review.) Copyright 2019 Technology Review, Inc. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC
By David Rotman In contrast to the existential angst currently in fashion around climate change, there's a cold-eyed calculation that its advocates, mostly economists, like to call the most important number you've never heard of. It's the social cost of carbon. It reflects the global damage of emitting one ton of carbon dioxide into the sky, accounting for its the price of fuel is wise economic policy. A much smaller increase sparked the gilets jaunes riots in France last winter. That is the dilemma, both political and ethical, that we all face with climate change. ( David Rotman is editor at large of MIT Technology Review.) Copyright 2019 Technology Review, Inc. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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