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BSNL and MTNL on ventilator, need 4G spectrum and an enterprise-focused business plan to survive

  • The PSU giants need to focus on rural 4G coverage once spectrum is allocated. There is high demand for data services from tier III towns and beyond. They should cash in on this opportunity.
  • Selling bulk bandwidth alone won’t add much to revenues. They need to develop an enterprise-first strategy and emerge as end-to-end solution providers for enterprise services.
  • Indeed, BSNL and MTNL must build a technology road map to leverage 5G once the spectrum auction happens. Design business case to use 5G to further enhance enterprise offerings.
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rishitejpal
5 Apr 2019 8 Mins Read 1 comments
(Left) Employees of the state-run Bharat Sanchar Nigam Limited (BSNL) shout anti-government slogans at the BSNL office in Kolkata on July 17, 2013. A motorcycle rally organised by MTNL; courtesy of Getty Images; Facebook
(Left) Employees of the state-run Bharat Sanchar Nigam Limited (BSNL) shout anti-government slogans at the BSNL office in Kolkata on July 17, 2013. A motorcycle rally organised by MTNL; courtesy of Getty Images; Facebook
It’s been the survival of the fittest in the world’s second-largest telecommunications market, India. Ferocious tariff wars impelled a wave of consolidation, with only a handful of players left standing. Somehow still in the game, amid the mayhem, are the two public-sector giants, BSNL and MTNL. Ponderous and lethargic, like most PSUs, they too have struggled
political hurdles need to be overcome. Ultimately, these PSUs are running on a ventilator that gets intermittent power supply. Given their current condition, eventually these public sector telcos will die, but the government has to decide whether it wants to let it die gracefully or pull the plug once and for all. ( Graphics by Mohammad Arshad)
It’s been the survival of the fittest in the world’s second-largest telecommunications market, India. Ferocious tariff wars impelled a wave of consolidation, with only a handful of players left standing. Somehow still in the game, amid the mayhem, are the two public-sector giants, BSNL and MTNL. Ponderous and lethargic, like most PSUs, they too have struggled political hurdles need to be overcome. Ultimately, these PSUs are running on a ventilator that gets intermittent power supply. Given their current condition, eventually these public sector telcos will die, but the government has to decide whether it wants to let it die gracefully or pull the plug once and for all. ( Graphics by Mohammad Arshad)

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