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Migration’s vicious cycle: First, climate change fuels exodus to urban areas. Then, the pressure on cities exacerbates environmental issues.

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Climate Change

Migration’s vicious cycle: First, climate change fuels exodus to urban areas. Then, the pressure on cities exacerbates environmental issues.

Mass migration to cities is adding to environmental pressures such as water scarcity, rising temperatures, and pollution. But policymakers look the other way.
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29 Mar 2019 4 Mins Read 0 comment
Rajasthani woman fetches water in a refugee camp on the outskirts of Srinagar. She moved from her native place to escape the harsh climate. During the years of conflict, all the Indians who lived in Srinagar were displaced and fled to a refugee camp outside Delhi. Getty Images
Rajasthani woman fetches water in a refugee camp on the outskirts of Srinagar. She moved from her native place to escape the harsh climate. During the years of conflict, all the Indians who lived in Srinagar were displaced and fled to a refugee camp outside Delhi.
"Who wants to leave home to live in an alien land?" asks Mithun Kazi. Battered by the repeated and brutal cyclones and floods in the Bangladesh part of the Sunderbans, a calamity that claimed several of his family members, Kazi, who is in his early twenties, fled to Kolkata around five years ago. He now ekes out a living
the survey was city planning and public utilities, along with finances. Clearly, India’s cities have a lot of catching up to do. The lack of policy preparedness to accommodate the surge of migrants — with nowhere to go — could make the task of rescuing urban India much more daunting, if not impossible. ( Graphics by Mohammad Arshad)
"Who wants to leave home to live in an alien land?" asks Mithun Kazi. Battered by the repeated and brutal cyclones and floods in the Bangladesh part of the Sunderbans, a calamity that claimed several of his family members, Kazi, who is in his early twenties, fled to Kolkata around five years ago. He now ekes out a living the survey was city planning and public utilities, along with finances. Clearly, India’s cities have a lot of catching up to do. The lack of policy preparedness to accommodate the surge of migrants — with nowhere to go — could make the task of rescuing urban India much more daunting, if not impossible. ( Graphics by Mohammad Arshad)

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